Tag Archives: African American culture

Book Review: The Twelve Tribes Of Hattie.

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A contemporary book that captures Black life in the South from a prominent time of Black migration. Each chapter delivering different themes and common concerns that Black people face in their everyday lives. Living through the characters and their moments of triumphs. Finding a truer value of love and the dimensions it takes on. What book does all of this? This one, of course.

The Twelve Tribes of Hattie not only made me feel as if I could possibly be the thirteenth tribe (in a creepy allegorical sense), but it was a great book to read and dive into. This book not only showed the impact of self-esteem and love, but through the perspective of family and how love has an effect on future generations.

The book starts off with tragic deaths that lay the foundation of how the story will develop throughout the book. Hattie, the main character, and the mother of the dead children, is shown through each chapter from their adolescent years, illustrating the impact that her actions had on the different characters in each chapter. I don’t want to give the book away too much, because each chapter shows the characters in their rarest forms. Each chapter is FILLED with topics on religion, sexuality, infidelity, womanhood, mental disorders, and soooo much more.

There are many observations and themes that are represented in this book. Womanhood, more importantly is very interesting to look at in Hattie. With the main character being the center of this book, every other character is seen to be a burden on Hattie’s back. If haven’t eleven children isn’t enough, the struggle that Hattie goes through (without barely mentioning) depicts the strong, but very weak, complex woman Hattie is in the text.

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Ayana Mathis, thank you for writing a book that can be so melodramatic but impactful at the very same time. Living in a book and feeling like I was in the story is beyond creative, as a novelist; to be able to make a reader feel as such.

Not really a book review but for a call to actually go out and get you a copy! I tried my hardest to not give ANYTHING in the book away, solely because I want our viewers to go ahead and read it!

Have you read it already? Tell us what you think about it in the comments below!

#SupremeBlackout

Hip Hop is a large piece of African American culture. In a time where drugs and poverty were ruining the black family, hip hop was a way for young blacks to let out their frustrations in a positive manner. Hip Hop saved a lot of lives by young Men and Women choosing to put down a gun and picking up a mic.

The AfroMadu team was blessed with opportunity to be apart of an amazing experience. We were able to witness how Hip-Hop has evolved, and see first hand how, the more things change, the more they stay the same. We were serenaded by songstresses and enlightened by MCs. As a Hip Hop enthusiast I was shocked and relieved that there was still so much talent playing in front of my eyes.

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The event, The Supreme Blackout, which took place at Nicholas in Brooklyn, was truly a gracious experience. In addition to amazing music there were also massages, assorted hand crafted jewelry, and organic libations. Nicholas’ themselves, are a cool shop full of clothing, incense, and a lot of Afro-Parafinalia.

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The vibe was so smooth, you could spread it with a butter knife. Our hosts for the evening were the Bi-Lingual, Duo, Negros Americanos, hailing from the hometown of AfroMadu’s founder, Plainfield, NJ. MC Elijah Black and DeShawn Supreme were the first two performers and each brought that raw Hip Hop deep rooted in personal experience.

image-12Dread Blaq is a dope songstress who rapped a little, sang a little and finished up by playing Nat King Cole on a Violin……A VIOLIN!!!! Blak Orfan are a girl duo who have that old school swagger, reminiscent of Queen Latifah and other Old School FemCees.

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Danielle Watson came heavy with that reggae vibe that just made you want to better yourself and those around you. Her cohort played harmony on guitar and had a smooth West Indian voice, that complimented Danielle in a way that you just had to close your eyes and bop to them. The show closed out with our host taking over the stage and performing songs in both English and Spanish which was incredible! Even though I do not speak a lick of Spanish the beats backing them was enough for me to musically not skip a beat.

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I left the event feeling as if I just left a church service! Feeling revived and ready for the next event just like this one! If any of our future events are half as good as this one, you do not want to miss it!!

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