Tag Archives: Black books

#BookClubMadu November 2016

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For the month of November, we will be reading Marc Lamont Hill’s, Nobody: Casualties of America’s War on the Vulnerable, from Ferguson to Flint and Beyond. From your feedback, we noticed how necessary it was to continue the conversation about the state of our Black bodies. Antoine and I were so encouraged and inspired from all of the love notes and great things you all said last time. So, let’s continue the discussion.

Hill’s book has been the topic of discussion in the book world for months and we want to give you the chance to get some opinions in for yourself!

Here is November’s reading schedule:

 

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So we hope that you will enjoy this one. Cause we definitely will. Happy reading!

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#BookClubMadu August 2016

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We are so excited to share with you this month’s book!

Yaa Gyasi’s Homegoing has been the latest rave in the world of literature and we thought it would be super awesome to have our readers right in!

IN ADDITION TO OUR AUGUST BOOK RELEASE, AfroMadu has teamed up with Urban One Radio to host a #BookClubMadu BI-WEEKLY PODCAST!!!!! Yes, a podcast to talk about books, culture, and everything in between. How cool is that?!?!?

Here’s how this month’s book will work:

-Discussions will be held on afromadu.com and on twitter, @afromadu.Throughout the week, we will be posting questions and quotes from Homegoing. 

-On August 14th, we will host our very first show, highlighting the first portion of the book. Readers are able to email us thoughts and questions about the book. Submission emails must be in before Thursday, August 11th.

We are so happy to be back with all of this exciting news. Are you? Happy reading! #BookClubMadu

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Homegoing’s schedule is as follows:

August 1st-14th: Part One (pages 1-153)

August 15th-31st: Part Two (pages 154-300)

Tweet us, email us, or find us on our social media sites using the hashtag, #BookClubMadu!

Book Review: Our Black Year.

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“..because you are dealing with a Black people who are inflicted with their own sense of inferiority.”

Maggie Anderson tells us the small story of feeling frustrated about the economic conditions of Black people. She wanted to make a change. And she did. Deciding to take a huge risk with her family, The Andersons decided that for the next year they would only purchase and support Black businesses. What does that look like? How is that even possible? Our Black Year is the record of their results. Her findings are not only ludicrous, but they also shed light to the biggest elephant in the room: Black people lack capital, which correlates to the oppression that we suffer from every day.

It is obvious that when we need to think about the Black dollar, and how much we are suffering from the lack of investing in our own products, businesses, and communities. This book proves that we have a stronghold on spending power, yet we barely own anything. Strange, right? We have the power to keep designer brands and corporations in business, yet we can’t find ways to fund our own businesses properly.

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Things like leakage, gentrification, urban planning, impoverished neighborhoods, and domination of other ethnic businesses are all discussed in the book for the plight of economic empowerment.

To sum, a very impactful paragraph slapped me in the face:

“These cold realities – that buying from businesses in Black neighborhoods doesn’t necessarily work, that so few Black-owned establishments have shortcomings—become clear in the early days of The Ebony Experiment. Uncovering the reasons why [the experiment] would take longer.

Despite a few points of privilege that needed to be checked (in my copy of the book, I definitely marked and scratched a few of her ideas) Maggie’s experience of simply buying Black for an entire year was filled with many emotional, physical, and mental roller coasters.

With dense research and great references, it is clear that Maggie finds herself torn between the facts and her actual opinion. I noticed that many of her personal statements were contradictory towards the facts that she presented about the state of the Black community and the lower class. I think this distinction is also important in understanding how people can disagree with the how’s and why’s of our institutional state of, well, lack.

I won’t give too much of the book away, because I am URGING folks, as usual, to begin to think about their financial future. This book is definitely a great start to begin to get your mind going about the economic state of the Black community.

Gonna leave you guys with one more gem:

“How will history view this generation of African Americans? Will they say that we had it all, that we made headway in corporate America and in the legal and educational arenas, but we earned our individual success and left our neighborhoods for disrespectful outsiders to raid? Will they say that we sold our history, potential, dreams, and destiny in exchange for the comforts of suburban life, shunning our own entrepreneurs and professionals, and treating them with condescension? Did we squander our chances? Fail to deliver on so much promise?”

Happy reading!

For Colored Girls Who Decide to Reflect and Not Mourn The Loss Of A Giant.

I know why the caged bird sings. She sings for hope. She sings so her sound can be heard. She also sings, because if she doesn’t, her song will only be a faint memory. And the memory of once singing will be lost and trapped inside of her. What does that perfect melody do for the bird that once wanted to sing? Most importantly, how can that suppressed melody potentially effect the other caged birds into breaking free? We wouldn’t know. The caged bird has to sing first…. 

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Yesterday, I woke up to the tragic news of Maya’s death. Just like any unfortunate news of that degreeSixty million and more
I will call them my people, which were not my people; and her beloved, which was not beloved., we often become sad and frustrated about death in general and how people die. I had to rethink this news of Maya’s death and reevaluate the meaning of death. I didn’t feel as if Maya left the world and took the impact that she left on me and other Black women, but it was as if a bigger message that was sent to us: the time is now.

“I can be changed by what happens to me. But I refuse to be reduced by it.”

We always rely on civil right activists to continue the fight for justice, but can they really continue the fight by themselves? why does it take our elders to die to realize that we must keep on? Why does Maya have to leave the earth so my passion for writing and truth-telling becomes reestablished?

“Nothing will work unless you do.”

We live on the backs of  giants. We are the branches of a strong oak tree. Yet we continue to not live through our fullest potential. Our ancestors are tired of lifting us up. We must nurture our own minds and circumstances and continue the fight. The fight of our liberation. Opening that small gate so that we can become free birds. This starts by picking up where they left off and keep it going!

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As far as Maya’s fight? She showed me that it was ok to be flawed. That my story can illuminate the entire world and allow other women to tell theirs. She was willing to sacrifice her small pride and gained an abundance of humility from standing firm in what she believed, regardless of her adversities and struggles. We lost flesh, but we gained her spirit. Her spirit will forever live and her intrinsic motivations, to allow the to coincide with her extrinsic ones will be my motivation to sing my melody and help others become free of their cages.

I will not mourn Maya’s life. I will use her legacy to continue to build mine. Thank you for everything that you did. Your patrimony will forever live on.

Book Review: The Twelve Tribes Of Hattie.

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A contemporary book that captures Black life in the South from a prominent time of Black migration. Each chapter delivering different themes and common concerns that Black people face in their everyday lives. Living through the characters and their moments of triumphs. Finding a truer value of love and the dimensions it takes on. What book does all of this? This one, of course.

The Twelve Tribes of Hattie not only made me feel as if I could possibly be the thirteenth tribe (in a creepy allegorical sense), but it was a great book to read and dive into. This book not only showed the impact of self-esteem and love, but through the perspective of family and how love has an effect on future generations.

The book starts off with tragic deaths that lay the foundation of how the story will develop throughout the book. Hattie, the main character, and the mother of the dead children, is shown through each chapter from their adolescent years, illustrating the impact that her actions had on the different characters in each chapter. I don’t want to give the book away too much, because each chapter shows the characters in their rarest forms. Each chapter is FILLED with topics on religion, sexuality, infidelity, womanhood, mental disorders, and soooo much more.

There are many observations and themes that are represented in this book. Womanhood, more importantly is very interesting to look at in Hattie. With the main character being the center of this book, every other character is seen to be a burden on Hattie’s back. If haven’t eleven children isn’t enough, the struggle that Hattie goes through (without barely mentioning) depicts the strong, but very weak, complex woman Hattie is in the text.

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Ayana Mathis, thank you for writing a book that can be so melodramatic but impactful at the very same time. Living in a book and feeling like I was in the story is beyond creative, as a novelist; to be able to make a reader feel as such.

Not really a book review but for a call to actually go out and get you a copy! I tried my hardest to not give ANYTHING in the book away, solely because I want our viewers to go ahead and read it!

Have you read it already? Tell us what you think about it in the comments below!