Tag Archives: Black women

Guest Submission: “Slipped Too Deep”

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This poem was inspired by the choreopoem “For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Suicide When the Rainbow Is Enuf” by Ntozake Shange. Like Shange’s, this poem expresses one of the many struggles and obstacles that African-American women may face throughout their lives.

 

Slipped Too Deep

I moaned for it.

Gripped your skin, and let you push it in-to me

Raw.

My hands shook when you gave it to me.

An orgasm tried to reverse the present but you shoved it back in with two fingers

I loved every bit of it.

And at the time I didn’t know the gift was from your ex,

She picked it up, gave it to you, and then went to the next.

You claimed she was the best.

And I strived to be better, strived to get wetter.

To do things to you she didn’t know existed, but that girl was gifted.

Talented at keeping secrets and giving diseases-

My heart was begging and pleading,

And neither of us could hear it.

Your eyes whispered I’m cheating on you while you were on top

And I encouraged the deceit, screaming don’t stop!

The subliminal message behind every “I love you” was,

“but I say that to all of y’all”

One confession made me feel so small. All of this anger inside of me is building a wall,

That I refuse to climb.

I just knew you were all mine.

My selfish ass never shared nothing,

But all this time you was fronting.

Smiled in my face

And let another bitch take my place.

It’s not right

Stabbed my heart, kissed my cheek, and then cleaned off the knife.

You fucked up my life!

And I cant forgive you.

Still cant believe all of the things you confessed to.

Images create themselves in my mind of what you did to her,

Got to get rid of ya’

Deleted text messages read “sorry I gave you Chlamydia

 

Stephanie Williams 

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Audre Lorde: Use of Anger; Sister Outsider.

Allow this excerpt to be the foundation of language that is presented in this post:

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The stereotypical thought of Black women always being angry, as shown in the text, is not to scare or send people away, but an outlet from the sense of rage that we deal with on a daily basis. The intersectionality of both race and gender and realizing that while idea of White supremacy is dawning on people, the patriarchal views of men ESPECIALLY Black men can be a daunting factor to Black women. Lorde’s statement, “My anger has meant pain to me but it has also meant survival, and before I give it up I’m going to be sure that there is something at least as powerful to replace it on the road to clarity.”, shows how anger is a coping mechanism to the oppression that is faced.

As a Black women, this text was very relatable to my past experiences. Encountering racism on a daily basis and birthing rage from feeling oppressed only allows me to turn rage into anger and find ways to get through the dark tunnel of oppression.

Audre Lorde’s work, here, shows that it is ok to be mad or angry about the situations you are in. This anger, if used correctly, is consciously making choice to not lash out on the things that bother you. Lorde shows Black women that we are all in this together and are feelings are noticed and have meaning to it.  What do you think about the text? Let us know! 

Book Review: Sister Citizen.

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Ever read a book that made you reevaluate your life because of the factual information it discussed? Black women! Melissa- Harris Perry’s thought-provoking book CAREFULLY weeds out the problem with Black women and their issues of trying to fit into a society that labels us as second-class citizens. Harris-Perry makes claim that our experiences in society has a DIRECT correlation in politics. 

At first, I was a bit apprehensive in reading a book that compared my experiences (as a Black woman) to the political system, but every detail and argument was super right in the evaluation of Black women trying to readjust in a “crooked room” (you will understand once you read). Each chapter showed real-life events that occurred in a 5-year span that depicted Black women being victimized or scrutinized, and how those events also linked backed to these “second class citizens”. Things like the “Mammy”, “Jezebel”, and “Strong Black Woman” stereotypes are also discussed, arguing that ALL labels are simply a way to gain recognition in a place where Black women are silenced.

It is interesting to have a  book that helps you understand the adversities that are faced from Melissa Harris-Perry, who is a Black women. It allows you to think differently and critically about the conversations that are talked about in your daily life, along with incidents and scenarios that happens on the news and even in your surroundings.

I don’t want to give the book away too much, but this book set the tone for understanding history, contemporary issues, and the problems we face, as Black women if we don’t dissect the many issues that follow. Feeding into stereotypes, or even trying to steer away from stereotypes will both be detrimental to Black women in America. 

AfroMadu, as always, challenges our viewers to read! If you read this book, or want to tell us about a book that you read, email us at afromadu@gmail.com. Let the world know what you’re reading! 

The Ingredients to My Fro.

Day in and day out I hear multiple conversations on the surface reasons as to why ladies are becoming natural. A few are: 

“I decided to grow my hair naturally because the chemicals made my hair fall out” 

“I wanted to try something healthier” 

“I’m trying a new look” 

However behind every afro there are reasons to why we have gone natural, I called these our ingredients to our fro. I’m only going to give three in this post. 

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Being Natural is in Style

Believe it or not, there are individuals that decide to participate in certain behaviors as a result of the mass population indulging in them as well. However, others may look as some as simply following trends.  

 

My Hair Has No Other Choice 

While some ladies love rocking their newly healthy hair please do not be fools. Some ladies have damaged hair for perms, weaves, and other hair experiments. Before the afrocentric look became extremely popular again, these young ladies were trying their best to find ways to make their damaged hair look decent. Now that females rocking low cuts are not only in style in addition to being sexy, these women are able to rock out and grow healthy hair. 

My Prerogative

Now to the lady that just wanted something different. She’s not doing it to fit in or to look more “black”. Most likely she’s been natural and now she’s “in style”.  Also, some women like the versatility of having a perm then going natural to give their hair a short break from the chemicals in a perm. 

**Disclaimer**

 Having natural hair does not always mean having healthy hair. Yes many use “natural products” however too many products at one time can stunt your hair’s growth. There are plenty of people with perms who have healthy hair. 

No matter what are your ingredients to your fro my beautiful sisters, make sure you rock them out to the fullest. I would love to hear the ingredients to your fro. 

Do Not Mistake the Television for a Looking Glass.

I went to an event tonight that was focused on the empowerment of the Black Woman, and I must admit as much as I thought I knew about Women in general, I had no idea how much baggage they carried in the curve of  their smiles, with the excess spilling out of their pockets books. For that, I apologize. I have often mistaken the sass of Women, for outright disdain when it simply, could have been fatigue from walking around carrying the weight of not only her thoughts but the constant judgement the Black Woman bares the instant she exits her threshold. I will no longer fall victim to the insensitivity many of my Brothers have falling victim to, trying to tailor the Woman that wears her heart on her sleeve. 

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I have written in previous post about my love for the Black Woman, I see them all as personified art, with each curve and each follicle being a stroke of the creators paint brush, each somewhat similar but unapologetically unique at the same time. So this hits very close to home. Raised in a house with two older sisters, my Mother and Grandmother, I would never think that the pain they self imposed, whether it be a perm, or eyebrow waxing or what have you, would be so that they could go outside and be seen as an actual member of society. The mind set is so absurd, that one must  jump through hoops to look “desirable” on the outside for people to want to know the beauty that resides within. This world is tainted and I want to take the time out and use my medium to let every Woman that is reading this that if no one ever told you, you were beautiful, I am saying it right now! You Are Gorgeous! I mean that from the bottom of my heart. Do not hang your head for any reason because you were made in God’s image, so walk as if you are trying to talk to him face to face and thank him for your many blessing. DO NOT EVER apologize, for your complexion, your curves or the coarseness of your hair because you are so much more than any of those things. 

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The media has started this facade that all Women must be a default, no one varying from the next. Ladies this is a lie and you should not stand for it. If The Almighty wanted every Woman to look the same then he would have made you that way. Embrace your insecurities, sharpen them until they transform from a shield you hide behind to a sword that you fight with. The media is not real, what you see every morning is. Focus on the “Im every Woman”s and not the “Girl You Look Good Wont You Back That Thang Up”, even though I know that one genre heavily out weighs the other. The power of Man, in a general since of all human beings, comes from inside of you so for every compliment you do not get, you give yourself one and then give one to the girl who also may not have gotten one. Kindness has always been contagious, be the stone that causes miles of ripples in the Sea.

I hate when Men say that they apologize on behalf of all Men, that is asinine. I do apologize however for the times, however few, that I made any Woman feel as if you was not the Queen that she is. I make a promise to all Women that when my kingdom begins and my Queen and I welcome our Prince into the world, from day one he will be taught respect, humility and admiration for the beauty that lies within and outside of a women. My Princess will no that Daddy thinks she is gorgeous, and the television is a make believe place and the magazines tend to pretend that, the Women that call their pages home are perfect, and at this point I will point her to a mirror so she can see first hand want perfection really is.

As Always, I Love You, God Loves You, Love Yourself,

Man of Madu

New Season, New Goals.

As the summer is coming to an end most people find themselves coming up with new goals for the remaining four months of the year. This year I am guilty as charged. My new goal is to get fit (I cannot afford to lose any weight) and find a constructive activity like kickboxing or Zumba. Granted I have a low cut so I do not have to worry about sweating my hair out. However, here are some tips to be able to work out yet not sweat out your hair too much.

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Time:
If you love to run, run early in the morning when the air is still cool. This allows your hair to sweat out a little less.

How to style:
Natural hair- if you braid your hair at night then keep it the same.
Permed hair- you can keep it wrapped by putting bobby pins in it.

Scarves: Some may feel scarves are too ghetto and should not be worn to the gym. However, I feel if you have a hair style that needs it then wear it. Just make sure it’s the best scarf you have. Don’t go to the gym in your scarf with all the holes in it. If you still feel uncomfortable then style your scarf to make it look like a fashion statement.

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Don’t let the pressure of your hair stop you from reaching your goals. Please share if you use a different style to protect your hair when you work out.

~B.R.A.T (Black, Radical and Thorough

Chapters 1-3: Realization

“Waiting for the world to be made.”

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Hurston’s beginning chapters started off with Janine current issue of her husband dying, and the flashback of how her life used to be. Janine thought of her bearing love to be a pear tree when she was younger, having the tree bloom with fruitful spirits and plenty of shade to secure her love and trust in a man. Her tree was then rot when she was forced to marry a man that she couldn’t find love in her heart to accept. Janine, still pitying herself for marrying a complete stranger because of the command of her Nanny wanted to love so much but couldn’t.

“You know honey, us colored folks is branches without roots and that makes things come round in queer ways.”

It is clear here that for centuries, Black women have been dealing with force and the baggage of doing things for others. In order for Janine to be on good terms with Nanny, the lady that practically raised her, she had to marry a man that she barely knew. Janine is still looking for her Pear tree love, that burning passion that she has for love, so bad until she is forcing herself to love a man that she doesn’t want to love.

How do you feel about the baggage and force that Janine has to deal with in these first chapters?